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Wildland/Urban Interface - Homeowner Resources




Alabama Forestry Commission Publications
   
50 Ways to Protect Your Woodland Home from Wildfire
Wildfires occur regularly in Alabama. Whether started by humans or by lightning, they are part of a natural cycle that helps to maintain the health of our forests.

Alabama is experiencing a movement of population from cities and towns into forestland and remote areas. Woodland homeowners must address the dangers that exist around them, particularly wildfire.

This guide contains suggestions and recommendations based on professional judgment, experience, and research. It is intended to serve as a guide to help you protect your most valuable assets – your family and your home.

If you live in the Wildland/Urban interface and would like a free consultation,
complete and submit the attached questionnaire.

   
Five Ways to Protect Your Forestland from Wildfire
Damages to your timberland from wildfire can be devastating to your forests and wildlife. A single wildfire during the wrong set of conditions can wipe out years of investment in your trees. Here are five ways you can become proactive in wildfire protection.
   
Fire Risk Guide Book Is Your Home Protected From Wildfire?
The threat from wildfire is very real and there are no guarantees that there is the capability to protect all homes. However, by taking the personal responsibility for reducing hazards around your property, you may substantially reduce the risks from a wildfire. It is critical to make those changes before a fire becomes a threat to you, your family, your home and other structures!

 
   
Fire Risk Assessement Cover Free Fire Risk Assessment Consultation
You can reduce risks of wildfires damaging your home by implementing a few simple prevention measures. It is important to make those changes before a fire starts! The Alabama Forestry Commission wants to help you. This is a free service and there are no requirements that you complete any of our recommendations.

If you live in the Wildland/Urban interface and would like a free consultation, complete and submit the attached questionnaire.
   
Living with Fire Cover Living with Fire
Our ability to live more safely in this environment depends on "pre-fire" activities. Research shows by being proactive before a wildfire occurs, you have a better chance of saving lives and  property from wildfire. This publication is provided to help you (homeowners, firefighters and the general public)identify numerous activities that will help you con-exist more safely with wildfire. Our ability to live more safely in this environment depends on "pre-fire" activities. Research shows by being proactive before a wildfire occurs, you have a better chance of saving lives and  property from wildfire. This publication is provided to help you (homeowners, firefighters and the general public)identify numerous activities that will help you con-exist more safely with wildfire.
 
Additional Publications
 
Be Prepared Cover Are You Prepared for a Wildfire

Wildfires often begin unnoticed.  They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes. Reduce your risk by preparing now-before wildfire strikes. Meet with your family to decide what to do and where to go if wildfires threaten your area. Follow the steps listed in this brochure to protect your family, home and property.
   
Is Your Home Protect Image FIREWISE Homeowners Guide to Protection
Wildfires occur regularly. Whether started by humans or by lightning, they are part of a natural cycle that helps to maintain the health of our forests. Today, more than ever, people are
moving into remote areas, with the desire to "get back to nature," without addressing the dangers that exist around them. A tremendous wildfire danger exists where homes blend together with the wildland, creating the wildland/urban interface. The addition of homes there interrupts the natural cycle of wildfires. Ultimately, this contributes to a dangerous build-up of old vegetation, leading to an uncontrollable wildfire.
   
Firewise Landscaping FIREWISE Landscape Considerations
A well-maintained landscape can not only enhance the beauty and value of any property— it can also serve as a fuel break. Under the right conditions, a “Firewise” home can even survive a wildfire. The goal is to keep your landscape lean, clean and green. If water is scarce, contact a landscape specialist to discuss plants that require less irrigation and are native to your area.
   
FireWise Landscaping Checklist Cover FIREWISE Landscape Checklist
There are several things you should consider when constructing, renovating, or adding to a firewise home. This one page brochure is a checklist of items to keep in mind.
   
Selecting Firewise Plants Cover
Selecting/Maintaining Firewise Plants for Landscaping University of FL & USDA FS

Creating an area of defensible space is one of the most important actions. Defensible space is defined as an area of modified vegetation between natural areas (e.g., woodlands) and homes that breaks up the continuity of plants and allows firefighters to protect the home or, in absence of firefighters, allows the home to better survive on its own. Recommendations for defensible space suggest maintaining an area extending at least 30 feet outward from a house with plants
that are low in flammability (referred to as firewise plants).
   
Shrub Flammability Cover
Quick Guide to Firewise Shrubs University of FL & USDA FS

Did you know you can select shrubs based on their flammability? Researchers at the USDA Forest Service, University of Florida, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have developed flammability categories to indicate how easily and intensely a shrub will burn.


   
Selecting Firewise Shrub to Reduce Wildfire Risk University of FL & USDA FS

Living in the wildland-urban interface (where your home is near or surrounded by natural vegetation) provides a great opportunity for you to enjoy outdoor scenery, such as the
natural backdrop of a surrounding forest. Landscaping your yard allows you to enrich the natural scenery and enjoy your favorite flowers and foliage with attractive shrubs and groundcovers. Colorful flowering plants can also attract wildlife, enhancing the outdoor experience. However, in areas with moderate to high risk of wildfire, this same vegetation may provide fuel and make your home vulnerable. Plan your landscape to lower your risk of losing your home to wildfire and maintain a beautiful, wildlife-friendly yard. This illustrated guide can help you select shrubs for your landscape, particularly for homes in the southern United States.
   
RAGH Cover Wildfire Risk Assessment Guide for Homeowners in the Southern United States
Published by University of Florida - Funded by the National Fire Plan (pdf)
Risk assessment allows homeowners to evaluate their particular exposure to fire as well
as the critical factors that increase their risk. This guide will help you determine your risk and
how to reduce it.
 
Additional Resources:

USDA Forest Service - Southern Region - Wildfire Prevention and Wildland Urban Interface
 
 

Prescribed Burning Landowner Application | Hazardous Fuel Reduction Application